BuiltWithNOF

Hereford City Heritage

The Mayor’s Chain

The Six strong gateways of the City of Hereford

St Owens Gate (formerly St Andrew’s Gate) - demolished in 1782

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This was the south eastern gate into the city and was named after the nearby church.

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late 18th century watercolour; The Inn sign, a prominent feature, is probably for the ‘Lamb & Flag’ inn.

Notes by Archenfield Archaeology on ‘Linden Villas’ near the site of ‘St Owens Gate’

Eigne Gate - demolished in 1787

Eign Gate

This was the main gate leading into the city from the west, close to the stream that fed the city ditch.

Bye Street Gate, also called Byester’s Gate and also Bishop’s Gate - demolished in 1798

Bye Street - now called Commercial Road - This was the north eastern gate into the city.The gate is thought to have stood midway along it. It ended its career as a jail - it had stone figures in stone chains over its passage, and so seldom held prisoners of consequence that the jailor was often a woman.

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Bye Street Gate0001_WEB

about 1794 - copied from a painting by Thomas Hearne in the British Museum. ackn:Hereford by Ron Shoesmith

Friar’s Gate (Barton Gate) - demolished in 1787

This gatewy was the only gateway in the old Saxon defences which was reused when the defences were enlarged after 1189; It was at the western end of the old main street (King Street-St Nicholas Street). Friar’s Gate was the least used of the six gates.

Ths was the gate that was successfully taken by Colonel Birch’s forces towards the close of the Civil War.

Widemarsh Gate (North Gate) - demolished in 1798

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This gate stood in line with Broad Street and was the north gate into the city.

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Shortly before demolition in 1798. Cannons were fired through this gate to ‘scoure the street’ in 1643.

Wye Bridge Gate - demolished in 1782

no sketches or pictures have been found

Some work took place on the gates in 1216 when timber from the Royal Forest of Haywood was granted for such use.

In later years there were also Turnpike or Toll Gates on the approach roads to the City.